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In Conversation

KATE GREENE with Jacquelyn Marie Gallo

In 2013, Kate was crew writer and second-in-command on a simulated Mars mission for the NASA-funded HI-SEAS (Hawai’i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) project. For four months, she and five fellow crew members lived in a geodesic dome on a remote volcano in Hawai'i conducting research on the effects of isolation, health, and well-being for astronauts on potential Mars missions.

In Conversation

LEIGH STEIN with Kathleen Rooney

Leigh Stein’s second novel, Self Care, examines the ambiguities inherent in its title concept, delivering a hilarious and scathing satire on the toxicity and contradictions of contemporary wellness culture and commodified feminism.

Kevin Carey’s Set in Stone: poems

Carey renders poetic moments of breakaway energy in a tight game of memory, reflection, loss, and regret. He feeds the ball again and again to what hurts him. Carey eschews the technical for poems that ground the reader in a vivid place and tell as clear a story as possible.

Partial Reveals & Inclusive Revelations in the Post-Truth Simulacracy: The Poetics

The Poetics is interested in exactly this conjunction, and Ives questions both the narrative of history and the history of narrative as a form in elaborate, strident observations that are illuminating and speculative.

Can’t Look Away: Ben Ehrenreich’s Desert Notebooks

Western culture has viewed time as a linear march toward the future—a narrative with a solid beginning in classical antiquity and a foreseeable end, or at least a goal: an ideal society based on reason and achieved via technical advancement. It’s this “faith in progress” that Ehrenreich wants to attack.

Inkblot Journalism: Jay Kirk’s Avoid the Day

Jay Kirk’s second book is a novelistically novel form of literary investigation that is by turns bizarre and brilliant, hilarious and heartbreaking. There is no attempt to be objective or comprehensive, and as much as anything else the goal is to project Kirk’s own achingly honest story first onto a mystery, and then onto an adventure, both of which he more or less stumbles into.

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The Brooklyn Rail

JUL-AUG 2020

All Issues